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ANTI-AGING DRUGS AND SUPPLEMENTS
 
 5.1 DRUGS THAT ARE HIGHLY RECOMMENDED (for inclusion in your supplementation anti-aging program) 
   
 
  CO-ENZYME Q10  
   
Co-enzyme Q10: a new drug for cardiovascular disease.
Coenzyme Q10: a new drug for myocardial ischemia?
Effect of coenzyme Q10 therapy in patients with congestive heart failure: a long-term multicenter randomized study.
Coenzyme Q10--its importance, properties and use in nutrition and cosmetics.
Research on coenzyme Q10 in clinical medicine and in immunomodulation.
Human aging and global function of coenzyme Q10.
Coenzyme Q10 protects the aging heart against stress: studies in rats, human tissues, and patients.
Coenzyme Q10 supplementation provides mild symptomatic benefit in patients with Parkinson's disease.
Cellular redox activity of coenzyme Q10: effect of CoQ10 supplementation on human skeletal muscle.
Antioxidative efficacy of parallel and combined supplementation with coenzyme Q10 and d-alpha-tocopherol in mildly hypercholesterolemic subjects: a randomized placebo-controlled clinical study.
Dietary coenzyme Q10 supplementation alters platelet size and inhibits human vitronectin (CD51/CD61) receptor expression.
Coenzyme Q10 as a possible treatment for neurodegenerative diseases.
Coenzyme Q10: absorption, antioxidative properties, determinants, and plasma levels.
Effect of dietary coenzyme Q10 as an antioxidant in human plasma.
 
Introduction:

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), otherwise known as ubiquinone is a structure with vitamin-like activity. It has been recognized for its anti-aging activities. CoQ10 is made in the body and occurs naturally in all cells, but as we get older its production falls. CoQ10 can be found also in food, especially meat, but in very small amounts as it gets destroyed by thermal processing. This is why it is very important to supplement oneself with Coenzyme Q10. It also helps prevent and treat various diseases and conditions. It is a proven treat for cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, Periodontal Disease, stomach ulcers and impotence. It also aids weight loss and improves aerobic performance. It is known to be an energy booster and immune system enhancer.

   
   
J Clin Pharmacol. 1990 Jul;30(7):596-608.
Co-enzyme Q10: a new drug for cardiovascular disease.
Greenberg S, Frishman WH.
Department of Medicine, Mt. Sinai Hospital and Medical Center, New York, New York.

Co-enzyme Q10 (ubiquinone) is a naturally occurring substance which has properties potentially beneficial for preventing cellular damage during myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. It plays a role in oxidative phosphorylation and has membrane stabilizing activity. The substance has been used in oral form to treat various cardiovascular disorders including angina pectoris, hypertension, and congestive heart failure. Its clinical importance is now being established in clinical trails worldwide.

   
   
Med Clin North Am. 1988 Jan;72(1):243-58.
Coenzyme Q10: a new drug for myocardial ischemia?
Greenberg SM, Frishman WH.
Department of Medicine, Mt. Sinai Hospital and Medical School, New York, New York.

A biochemical rationale for using CoQ in treating certain cardiovascular diseases has been established. CoQ subserves an endogenous function as an essential cofactor in several metabolic pathways, particularly oxidative respiration. As an exogenous source in supraphysiologic doses, CoQ may have pharmacologic effects that are beneficial to tissues rendered ischemic and then reperfused. Its mechanism of action appears to be that of a free radical scavenger and/or direct membrane stabilizer. Initial clinical studies performed abroad and in the United States indicate that CoQ may be effective in treating certain patients with ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, toxin-induced cardiotoxicity, and possibly hypertension. The most intriguing property of CoQ is its potential to protect and preserve ischemic myocardium during surgery. Currently, CoQ is still considered an experimental agent and only further studies will determine whether it will be useful therapy for human cardiovascular disease states.

   
   
Clin Investig. 1993;71(8 Suppl):S134-6.
Effect of coenzyme Q10 therapy in patients with congestive heart failure: a long-term multicenter randomized study.
Morisco C, Trimarco B, Condorelli M.
Facolta di Medicina e Chiruriga, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II.

The improved cardiac function in patients with congestive heart failure treated with coenzyme Q10 supports the hypothesis that this condition is characterized by mitochondrial dysfunction and energy starvation, so that it may be ameliorated by coenzyme Q10 supplementation. However, the main clinical problems in patients with congestive heart failure are the frequent need of hospitalization and the high incidence of life-threatening arrhythmias, pulmonary edema, and other serious complications. Thus, we studied the influence of coenzyme Q10 long-term treatment on these events in patients with chronic congestive heart failure (New York Heart Association functional class III and IV) receiving conventional treatment for heart failure. They were randomly assigned to receive either placebo (n = 322, mean age 67 years, range 30-88 years) or coenzyme Q10 (n = 319, mean age 67 years, range 26-89 years) at the dosage of 2 mg/kg per day in a 1-year double-blind trial. The number of patients who required hospitalization for worsening heart failure was smaller in the coenzyme Q10 treated group (n = 73) than in the control group (n = 118, P < 0.001). Similarly, the episodes of pulmonary edema or cardiac asthma were reduced in the control group (20 versus 51 and 97 versus 198, respectively; both P < 0.001) as compared to the placebo group. Our results demonstrate that the addition of coenzyme Q10 to conventional therapy significantly reduces hospitalization for worsening of heart failure and the incidence of serious complications in patients with chronic congestive heart failure.

   
   

Ceska Slov Farm. 2000 May;49(3):119-23.
Coenzyme Q10--its importance, properties and use in nutrition and cosmetics.
Hojerova J.
Katedra mlieka, tukov a hygieny pozivatin-oddelenie kozmetologie Chemickotechnologickej fakulty Slovenskej technickej univerzity, Bratislava.

Coenzyme Q10, or ubiquinone, is a nutrient--a vitamin-like substance which plays a crucial role in the generation of cellular energy an in free radical scavenging in the human body. After the age of 35 to 40, the organism begins to lose its ability to synthesize Co Q10 from food and its deficiency develops. Ageing, poor eating habits, stress and infection--they all affect our ability to provide adequate amounts of Co Q10. Therefore Co Q10 supplementation may be very helpful for the organism. The present summarizing study reports the history of the discovery and research, properties, biochemical effects, dosage of Co Q10 deficiency in the human body. A possible use of Co Q10 as a dietary supplement and an ingredient for topical cosmetic products is described.

   
   
Drugs Exp Clin Res. 1985;11(8):539-45.
Research on coenzyme Q10 in clinical medicine and in immunomodulation.
Folkers K, Wolaniuk A.

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a redox component in the respiratory chain. CoQ10 is necessary for human life to exist; and a deficiency can be contributory to ill health and disease. A deficiency of CoQ10 in myocardial disease has been found and controlled therapeutic trials have established CoQ10 as a major advance in the therapy of resistant myocardial failure. The cardiotoxicity of adriamycin, used in treatment modalities of cancer, is significantly reduced by CoQ10, apparently because the side-effects of adriamycin include inhibition of mitochondrial CoQ10 enzymes. Models of the immune system including phagocytic rate, circulating antibody level, neoplasia, viral and parasitic infections were used to demonstrate that CoQ10 is an immunomodulating agent. It was concluded that CoQ10, at the mitochondrial level, is essential for the optimal function of the immune system.

   
   
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2002 Apr;959:396-411; discussion 463-5.
Human aging and global function of coenzyme Q10.
Linnane AW, Zhang C, Yarovaya N, Kopsidas G, Kovalenko S, Papakostopoulos P, Eastwood H, Graves S, Richardson M.
Centre for Molecular Biology and Medicine, Epworth Medical Centre, Richmond, Victoria 3121, Australia.

In this paper, we review two parts of our recent work on human skeletal muscle. The first part mainly describes changes occurring during aging, whereas the second part discusses the functions of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), particularly in relation to the aging process. During the lifetime of an individual, mtDNA undergoes a variety of mutation events and rearrangements. These mutations and their consequent bioenergenic decline, together with nuclear DNA damage, contribute to the reduced function of cells and organs, especially in postmitotic tissues. In skeletal muscle, this functional decline can be observed by means of changes with age in fiber type profile and the reduction in the number and size of the muscle fibers. In addition to the functions of coenzyme Q10 as an electron carrier in the respiratory chain and as an antioxidant, CoQ10 has been shown to regulate global gene expression in skeletal muscle. We hypothesize that this regulation is achieved via superoxide formation with H2O2 as a second messenger to the nucleus.

   
   
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2002 Apr;959:355-9; discussion 463-5.
Coenzyme Q10 protects the aging heart against stress: studies in rats, human tissues, and patients.
Rosenfeldt FL, Pepe S, Linnane A, Nagley P, Rowland M, Ou R, Marasco S, Lyon W, Esmore D.
Cardiac Surgical Research Unit, Alfred Hospital and Baker Institute, Prahran 3181, Australia.

With aging of the population, increasing numbers of elderly patients are presenting for cardiac surgery. However, the results in the elderly are inferior to those in the young. A likely contributing factor is an age-related reduction in cellular energy production in the myocardium during surgery, which is known to induce aerobic and ischemic stress. The lipophilic antioxidant and mitochondrial respiratory chain redox coupler, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), has the potential to improve energy production in mitochondria by bypassing defective components in the respiratory chain as well as by reducing the effects of oxidative stress. We hypothesized that CoQ10 pretreatment prior to stress could improve the recovery of the myocardium after stress.

   
   
Neurosci Lett. 2003 May 8;341(3):201-4.
Coenzyme Q10 supplementation provides mild symptomatic benefit in patients with Parkinson's disease.
Muller T, Buttner T, Gholipour AF, Kuhn W.
Department of Neurology, St. Josef Hospital, Ruhr University Bochum, Gudrunstrasse 56, Germany.

Features of Parkinson's disease (PD) include oxidative stress, nigral mitochondrial complex I deficiency and visual dysfunction, all of which are also associated with coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) deficiency. The objective of this monocenter, parallel group, placebo controlled, double-blind trial was to determine the symptomatic response of daily oral application of 360 mg CoQ(10) lasting 4 weeks on scored PD symptoms and visual function, measured with the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 Hue test (FMT), in 28 treated and stable PD patients. CoQ(10) supplementation provided a significant (P=0.01) mild symptomatic benefit on PD symptoms and a significantly (F((1,24))=8.48, P=0.008) better improvement of FMT performance compared with placebo. Our results indicate a moderate beneficial effect of oral CoQ(10) supplementation in PD patients.

   
   
Free Radic Res. 2002 Apr;36(4):445-53.
Cellular redox activity of coenzyme Q10: effect of CoQ10 supplementation on human skeletal muscle.
Linnane AW, Kopsidas G, Zhang C, Yarovaya N, Kovalenko S, Papakostopoulos P, Eastwood H, Graves S, Richardson M.
Centre for Molecular Biology and Medicine, Epworth Medical Centre, Richmond, Australia.

In this paper, we report results obtained from a continuing clinical trial on the effect of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) administration on human vastus lateralis (quadriceps) skeletal muscle. Muscle samples, obtained from aged individuals receiving placebo or CoQ10 supplementation (300mg per day for four weeks prior to hip replacement surgery) were analysed for changes in gene and protein expression and in muscle fibre type composition. Microarray analysis (Affymetrix U95A human oligonucleotide array) using a change in gene expression of 1.8-fold or greater as a cutoff point, demonstrated that a total of 115 genes were differentially expressed in six subject comparisons. In the CoQ10-treated subjects, 47 genes were up-regulated and 68 down-regulated in comparison with placebo-treated subjects. Restriction fragment differential display analysis showed that over 600 fragments were differentially expressed using a 2.0-fold or greater change in expression as a cutoff point. Proteome analysis revealed that, of the high abundance muscle proteins detected (2,086 +/- 115), the expression of 174 proteins was induced by CoQ10 while 77 proteins were repressed by CoQ10 supplementation. Muscle fibre types were also affected by CoQ10 treatment; CoQ10-treated individuals showed a lower proportion of type I (slow twitch) fibres and a higher proportion of type IIb (fast twitch) fibres, compared to age-matched placebo-treated subjects. The data suggests that CoQ10 treatment can act to influence the fibre type composition towards the fibre type profile generally found in younger individuals. Our results led us to the conclusion that coenzyme Q10 is a gene regulator and consequently has wide-ranging effects on over-all tissue metabolism. We develop a comprehensive hypothesis that CoQ10 plays a major role in the determination of membrane potential of many, if not all, sub-cellular membrane systems and that H2O2 arising from the activities of CoQ10 acts as a second messenger for the modulation of gene expression and cellular metabolism.

   
   
Free Radic Res. 2000 Sep;33(3):329-40.
Antioxidative efficacy of parallel and combined supplementation with coenzyme Q10 and d-alpha-tocopherol in mildly hypercholesterolemic subjects: a randomized placebo-controlled clinical study.
Kaikkonen J, Nyyssonen K, Tomasi A, Iannone A, Tuomainen TP, Porkkala-Sarataho E, Salonen JT.
Research Institute of Public Health, University of Kuopio, Finland.

It has been claimed that coenzyme Q10 (Q10) would be an effective plasma antioxidant since it can regenerate plasma vitamin E. To test separate effects and interaction between Q10 and vitamin E in the change of plasma concentrations and in the antioxidative efficiency, we carried out a double-masked, double-blind clinical trial in 40 subjects with mild hypercholesterolemia undergoing statin treatment. Subjects were randomly allocated to parallel groups to receive either Q10 (200 mg daily), d-alpha-tocopherol (700 mg daily), both antioxidants or placebo for 3 months. In addition we investigated the pharmacokinetics of Q10 in a separate one-week substudy. In the group that received both antioxidants, the increase in plasma Q10 concentration was attenuated. Only vitamin E supplementation increased significantly the oxidation resistance of isolated LDL. Simultaneous Q10 supplementation did not increase this antioxidative effect of vitamin E. Q10 supplementation increased and vitamin E decreased significantly the proportion of ubiquinol of total Q10, an indication of plasma redox status in vivo. The supplementations used did not affect the redox status of plasma ascorbic acid. In conclusion, only vitamin E has antioxidative efficiency at high radical flux ex vivo. Attenuation of the proportion of plasma ubiquinol of total Q10 in the vitamin E group may represent in vivo evidence of the Q10-based regeneration of the tocopheryl radicals. In addition, Q10 might attenuate plasma lipid peroxidation in vivo, since there was an increased proportion of plasma ubiquinol of total Q10.

   
   
J Cardiovasc Pharmacol. 1997 Jan;29(1):16-22.
Dietary coenzyme Q10 supplementation alters platelet size and inhibits human vitronectin (CD51/CD61) receptor expression.
Serebruany VL, Ordonez JV, Herzog WR, Rohde M, Mortensen SA, Folkers K, Gurbel PA.
Heart Associates Research & Education Foundation, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA.

Improved cardiovascular morbidity and mortality have been observed in several clinical studies of dietary supplementation with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, ubiquinone). Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the effects of CoQ10, but a comprehensive explanation of its cardioprotective properties is still lacking. One attractive theory links ubiquinone with the inhibition of platelets. The effect of CoQ10 intake on platelet size and surface antigens was examined in human volunteers. Study participants received 100 mg of CoQ10 twice daily in addition to their usual diet for 20 days. Receptor expression was measured by flow cytometry with monoclonal murine anti-human antibodies CD9 (p24), CD42B (Ib), CD41b (IIb), CD61 (IIIa), CD41a (IIb/IIIa), CD49b (VLA-2), CD62p (P selectin), CD31 (PECAM-1), and CD51/CD61 (vitronectin). An increase of total serum CoQ10 level (from 0.6 +/- 0.1 to 1.8 +/- 0.3 micrograms/ml; p < 0.001) was found at protocol termination. Fluorescence intensity was higher for the large platelets when compared with the whole platelet population. Significant inhibition of vitronectin-receptor expression was observed consistently throughout ubiquinone treatment. Reduction of platelet size was observed at the end of CoQ10 supplementation. Inhibition of the platelet vitronectin receptor and a reduction of the platelet size are direct evidence of a link between dietary CoQ10 intake and platelets. These findings may not be fully explained by the known antioxidant and bioenergetic properties of CoQ10. Diminished vitronectin-receptor expression and reduced platelet size resulting from CoQ10 therapy may contribute to the observed clinical benefits in patients with cardiovascular diseases.

   
   
Free Radic Res. 2002 Apr;36(4):455-60.
Coenzyme Q10 as a possible treatment for neurodegenerative diseases.
Beal MF.
Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York Presbyterian Hospital, NY 10021, USA.

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an essential cofactor of the electron transport gene as well as an important antioxidant, which is particularly effective within mitochondria. A number of prior studies have shown that it can exert efficacy in treating patients with known mitochondrial disorders. We investigated the potential usefulness of coenzyme Q10 in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Huntington's disease (HD). It has been demonstrated that CoQ10 can protect against striatal lesions produced by the mitochondrial toxins malonate and 3-nitropropionic acid. These toxins have been utilized to model the striatal pathology, which occurs in HD. It also protects against 1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) toxicity in mice. CoQ10 significantly extended survival in a transgenic mouse model of ALS. CoQ10 can significantly extend survival, delay motor deficits and delay weight loss and attenuate the development of striatal atrophy in a transgenic mouse model of HD. In this mouse model, it showed additive efficacy when combined with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, remacemide. CoQ10 is presently being studied as a potential treatment for early PD as well as in combination with remacemide as a potential treatment for HD.

   
   
Free Radic Res. 2002 Apr;36(4):389-97.
Coenzyme Q10: absorption, antioxidative properties, determinants, and plasma levels.
Kaikkonen J, Tuomainen TP, Nyyssonen K, Salonen JT.
Oy Jurilab Ltd, Kuopio, Finland.

The purpose of this article is to summarise our studies, in which the main determinants and absorption of plasma coenzyme Q10 (Q10, ubiquinone) have been assessed, and the effects of moderate dose oral Q10 supplementation on plasma antioxidative capacity, lipoprotein oxidation resistance and on plasma lipid peroxidation investigated. All the supplementation trials carried out have been blinded and placebo-controlled clinical studies. Of the determinants of Q10, serum cholesterol, serum triglycerides, male gender, alcohol consumption and age were found to be associated positively with plasma Q10 concentration. A single dose of 30 mg of Q10, which is the maximum daily dose recommended by Q10 producers, had only a marginal elevating effect on plasma Q10 levels in non-Q10-deficient subjects. Following supplementation, a dose-dependent increase in plasma Q10 levels was observed up to a daily dose of 200 mg, which resulted in a 6.1-fold increase in plasma Q10 levels. However, simultaneous supplementation with vitamin E resulted in lower plasma Q10 levels. Of the lipid peroxidation measurements, Q10 supplementation did not increase LDL TRAP, plasma TRAP, VLDL+LDL oxidation resistance nor did it decrease LDL oxidation susceptibility ex vivo. Q10 with minor vitamin E dose neither decreased exercise-induced lipid peroxidation ex vivo nor muscular damage. Q10 supplementation might, however, decrease plasma lipid peroxidation in vivo, as assessed by the increased proportion of plasma ubiquinol (reduced form, Q10H2) of total Q10. High dose vitamin E supplementation decreased this proportion, which suggests in vivo regeneration of tocopheryl radicals by ubiquinol.

   
   
Mol Aspects Med. 1994;15 Suppl:s97-102.
Effect of dietary coenzyme Q10 as an antioxidant in human plasma.
Weber C, Jakobsen TS, Mortensen SA, Paulsen G, Holmer G.
Medical Department B, State University Hospital (Rigshopitalet), Copenhagen, Denmark.

A human study including 22 volunteers was conducted to investigate the antioxidative effect in blood of dietary coenzyme Q10 supplementation. The levels of alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid, lipid peroxidation (measured as TBARS) and the redox status of CoQ10 (reduced CoQ10/total CoQ10) were measured in plasma as markers for the antioxidative status once a week during the study period. To introduce an increased oxidative stress, a fish oil supplementation was given. The levels of alpha-tocopherol and ascorbic acid and the redox status did not change upon CoQ10 supplementation, while the level of TBARS decreased. The decrease in TBARS might be ascribed to an antioxidative effect of the supplied CoQ10. The constant redox level of CoQ10 during the CoQ10 supplementation shows that the exogenous CoQ10 is reduced during absorption and subsequent incorporation into lipoproteins, which is a prerequisite for its antioxidative function. The fish oil supplementation resulted in a higher TBARS level and a lower alpha-tocopherol level, but the redox level of CoQ10 was unchanged. In conclusion, the CoQ10 supplementation resulted in a higher plasma level of reduced CoQ10 and a lower TBARS level, but sparing of other plasma antioxidants (i.e. ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol) was not observed.

 
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FASTING / LOW CALORIE PROGRAMS
on the Adriatic Coast
The Anti-Aging Fasting Program consists of a 7-28 days program (including 3 - 14 fasting days). 7-28-day low-calorie diet program is also available .
More information
    The anti-aging story (summary)
Introduction. Statistical review. Your personal aging curve
  Aging and Anti-aging. Why do we age?
    2.1  Aging forces (forces that cause aging
     
Internal (free radicals, glycosylation, chelation etc.) 
External (Unhealthy diet, lifestyle, wrong habits, environmental pollution, stress, poverty-change "poverty zones", or take it easy. etc.) 
    2.2 Anti-aging forces
     
Internal (apoptosis, boosting your immune system, DNA repair, longevity genes) 
External (wellness, changing your environment; achieving comfortable social atmosphere in your life, regular intake of anti-aging drugs, use of replacement organs, high-tech medicine, exercise)
    2.3 Aging versus anti-aging: how to tip the balance in your favour!
 
    3.1 Caloric restriction and fasting extend lifespan and decrease all-cause mortality (Evidence)
      Human studies
Monkey studies
Mouse and rat studies
Other animal studies
    3.2 Fasting and caloric restriction prevent and cure diseases (Evidence)
        Obesity
Diabetes
Hypertension and Stroke
Skin disorders
Mental disorders
Neurogical disorders
Asthmatic bronchitis, Bronchial asthma
Bones (osteoporosis) and fasting
Arteriosclerosis and Heart Disease
Cancer and caloric restriction
Cancer and fasting - a matter of controversy
Eye diseases
Chronic fatigue syndrome
Sleeping disorders
Allergies
Rheumatoid arthritis
Gastrointestinal diseases
Infertility
Presbyacusis
    3.3 Fasting and caloric restriction produce various
      biological effects. Effects on:
        Energy metabolism
Lipids metabolism
Protein metabolism and protein quality
Neuroendocrine and hormonal system
Immune system
Physiological functions
Reproductive function
Radio-sensitivity
Apoptosis
Cognitive and behavioral functions
Biomarkers of aging
    3.4 Mechanisms: how does calorie restriction retard aging and boost health?
        Diminishing of aging forces
  Lowering of the rate of gene damage
  Reduction of free-radical production
  Reduction of metabolic rate (i.e. rate of aging)
  Lowering of body temperature
  Lowering of protein glycation
Increase of anti-aging forces
  Enhancement of gene reparation
  Enhancement of free radical neutralisation
  Enhancement of protein turnover (protein regeneration)
  Enhancement of immune response
  Activation of mono-oxygenase systems
  Enhance elimination of damaged cells
  Optimisation of neuroendocrine functions
    3.5 Practical implementation: your anti-aging dieting
        Fasting period.
Re-feeding period.
Safety of fasting and low-calorie dieting. Precautions.
      3.6 What can help you make the transition to the low-calorie life style?
        Social, psychological and religious support - crucial factors for a successful transition.
Drugs to ease the transition to caloric restriction and to overcome food cravings (use of adaptogenic herbs)
Food composition
Finding the right physician
    3.7Fasting centers and fasting programs.
  Food to eat. Dishes and menus.
    What to eat on non-fasting days. Dishes and menus. Healthy nutrition. Relation between foodstuffs and diseases. Functional foods. Glycemic index. Diet plan: practical summary. "Dr. Atkins", "Hollywood" and other fad diets versus medical science
     

Vegetables
Fruits
Bread, cereals, pasta, fiber
Glycemic index
Fish
Meat and poultry
Sugar and sweet
Legumes
Fats and oils
Dairy and eggs
Mushrooms
Nuts and seeds
Alcohol
Coffee
Water
Food composition

  Anti-aging drugs and supplements
    5.1 Drugs that are highly recommended
      (for inclusion in your supplementation anti-aging program)
        Vitamin E
Vitamin C
Co-enzyme Q10
Lipoic acid
Folic acid
Selenium
Flavonoids, carotenes
DHEA
Vitamin B
Carnitin
SAM
Vinpocetine (Cavinton)
Deprenyl (Eldepryl)
    5.2 Drugs with controversial or unproven anti-aging effect, or awaiting other evaluation (side-effects)
        Phyto-medicines, Herbs
HGH
Gerovital
Melatonin
      5.3 Drugs for treatment and prevention of specific diseases of aging. High-tech modern pharmacology.
        Alzheimer's disease and Dementia
Arthritis
Cancer
Depression
Diabetes
Hyperlipidemia
Hypertension
Immune decline
Infections, bacterial
Infections, fungal
Memory loss
Menopause
Muscle weakness
Osteoporosis
Parkinson's disease
Prostate hyperplasia
Sexual disorders
Stroke risk
Weight gaining
    5.4 The place of anti-aging drugs in the whole
      program - a realistic evaluation
 
    6.1 Early diagnosis of disease - key factor to successful treatment.
      Alzheimer's disease and Dementia
Arthritis
Cancer
Depression
Diabetes
Cataracts and Glaucoma
Genetic disorders
Heart attacks
Hyperlipidemia
Hypertension
Immune decline
Infectious diseases
Memory loss
Muscle weakness
Osteoporosis
Parkinson's disease
Prostate hyperplasia
Stroke risk
Weight gaining
    6.2 Biomarkers of aging and specific diseases
    6.3 Stem cell therapy and therapeutic cloning
    6.4 Gene manipulation
    6.5 Prosthetic body-parts, artificial organs
        Blood
Bones, limbs, joints etc.
Brain
Heart & heart devices
Kidney
Liver
Lung
Pancreas
Spleen
    6.6 Obesity reduction by ultrasonic treatment
  Physical activity and aging. Experimental and clinical data.
        Aerobic exercises
Stretching
Weight-lifting - body-building
Professional sport: negative aspects
 
  Conclusion: the whole anti-aging program
    9.1 Modifying your personal aging curve
      Average life span increment. Expert evaluation.
     
Periodic fasting and caloric restriction can add 40 - 50 years to your lifespan
Regular intake of anti-aging drugs can add 20-30 years to your lifespan
Good nutrition (well balanced, healthy food, individually tailord diet) can add 15-25 years to your lifespan
High-tech bio-medicine service can add 15-25 years to your lifespan
Quality of life (prosperity, relaxation, regular vocations) can add 15-25 years to your lifespan
Regular exercise and moderate physical activity can add 10-20 years to your lifespan
These approaches taken together can add 60-80 years to your lifespan, if you start young (say at age 20). But even if you only start later (say at 45-50), you can still gain 30-40 years


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    9.2 The whole anti-aging life style - brief summary 
    References eXTReMe Tracker
        The whole anti-aging program: overview
         
       

       
     
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